Buffy and Spike Sitting in a Steam Punk Airship Tree

Review by Shaun Daniels and Edited by Sharon Wong

Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 9 Issue 7

Scripts by Andrew Chambliss, Pencils by Georges Jeanty, Inks by Karl Story, Colors by Michelle Madsen, Letters by Richards Starkings and Comicsrafts‘ Jimmy Betancourt, Covers by Phil Noto & Georges Jeanty, Dexter Vines and Michelle Madsen and Published by Dark Horse Comics.

Be forewarned as there be spoilers in this here review!  If you have not read Buffy Season 9 issue 6 or any of the previous Season 9 issues, we ask, “What is wrong with you? Read the books!!”  Issue 6 saw the real world crashing into the world of Buffy Summers.  Faced with a decision that ultimately affects more than just Buffy, she must now live with that choice.  Of course, it is the Buffyverse so things aren’t always ever simple and the creative team throws in a twist at the end for good measure.  Hopefully, Chambliss and company attempts something unique with the ending because it is treading dangerously close to a particular show from across the pond, or possibly even familiar territory from the TV show.  It is Buffy after all, and Chambliss and Jeanty have yet to let us down.

Buffy finds herself prematurely leaving her old digs for that of Spike’s steam punk airship.  A lot of unresolved issues start to bubble to the surface when Buffy moves in with him.  It seems that some loves never go away and for one reason or other, Buffy just can’t pick up on the signals.  Meanwhile, the detectives of San Francisco are knee deep in a vampire nest and in need of Spike’s help.  Spike benches Buffy because…(READ issue 6) and tries to play superhero but fails.  Buffy, never one to be sidelined, takes on the nest and saves the day except Buffy hasn’t been herself as of late (let’s just leave it at that).

Although Chambliss never wrote for the TV series Buffy, he gets this show and it reads like an episode of the series.  Well, that’s if the series had steam punk airships or talking alien bugs.  The humor in this book is mixed well with the real world and acts as a counterweight to Buffy’s situation.  The best comedic standout is when Buffy makes reference to the airship having European electrical sockets to which Spike replies, “Real question. Why do European’s use alien sockets?”  As for the dialogue, Chambliss gets the witty banter the show was known for.  It’s as if you can hear the actors’ voices in your head, or pick up on the fast pace delivery of the lines as you read them in your head.

Jeanty is churning out issue after issue of fun, well rendered pages.  The action in the book mimics the action on the show all while playing up to the strengths of comic book panels and unlimited SFX budgets.  Where Jeanty really nails it, is in the quiet moments that capture the real life decision that Buffy makes, the consequence to her actions and the situation.  Jeanty also draws the characters close enough to the actors so that fans of the TV series know who is whom.  He could have drawn the book in a photorealistic style based on the actors who played the characters but Jeanty puts his own stamp and flair on the book.

Now it is your turn to make a decision…read the book or miss out on vampire slaying goodness that is season 9.

Feedback is always welcomed at shaun@horrorhaven.com and sharon@horrorhaven.com. Be sure to friend us on facebook, follow us on twitter @FrightChannel, and subscribe to our RSS feed so you never miss any news and reviews.

Also, don’t forget to check out the The Fright Channel, the Internet’s favorite 24-hour internet horror television station.

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